Permits External Affairs

Frequently Asked Questions and Facts Index "F/G/H"

The following alphabetical index is to help you quickly find the answer to general permit questions.The keywords lead you to frequently asked questions and their answer, as well as links to fact sheets and specific web pages.

ALPHABETICAL INDEX:

[A] [B] [C]  [D]  [E]  [I/J/K]  [L/M]  [R] [N/O/P/Q] [S]  [T/U/V/W/X/Y/Z]

 

Keyword – F/G/H

Question/Answer/Fact

Fact Sheets

Importing and Exporting Your Commercial Wildlife Shipment
International Affairs (Division of Management Authority)
Migratory Bird Permits
Permits for Native Species under the ESA

Falconry

FAQ's

Feathers

Bald and Golden Eagles

Migratory Birds

Feces

Do I need a permit to import or export feces?  You do not need a permit from us to import or export wildlife feces into or out of the United States.  We consider samples of feces to be a wildlife byproduct, rather than a part, product, or derivative.  While we do not regulate fecal samples, we believe it is important that researchers collect samples in a manner that does not harm the wildlife and that complies with the laws of the country where the collection occurs.  Contact the foreign country to meet its requirements.  If the foreign country requires you to have a U.S. CITES document for fecal samples, click here for an application form.  Contact the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Disease Control, and State to meet their requirements.

Fee

How much is the application processing fee?  Check the individual application form to determine the fee, or review the regulations at 50 CFR 13.11.

Flasked Seedlings

Do I need a permit to import or export flasked seedlings of CITES-listed plants?  Flasked means plant material obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in sterile containers.  Flasked seedlings of CITES Appendix-II and -III plants and hybrids are exempt from CITES controls.  Flasked seedlings of artificially propagated Appendix-I orchid species and artificially propagated hybrids of one or more Appendix-I species also are exempt.  Plants grown from such seedlings, however, are listed under CITES and require permits to be imported or exported.  Check the CITES list to see how a plant species is listed. Click here for a CITES fact sheet. Check with APHIS to meet its requirements.

Flowers, Cut

Do I need a permit to import or export cut flowers of CITES-listed plants?  Cut flowers of artificially propagated non-hybrid CITES Appendix-I plants require permits to be imported or exported. All other cut flowers, including all hybrids, are exempt from CITES controls and do not require CITES permits to be imported or exported. Check the CITES list to see how a plant species is listed. Click here for a CITES fact sheet. Check with APHIS to meet its requirements.

Ginseng

Do I need a permit to import or export ginseng?  American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and the Russian population of ginseng (Panax ginseng) are listed in Appendix II of CITES.  The live plant and the following parts, products, and derivatives are listed:  whole and sliced roots and parts of roots, excluding manufactured parts or derivatives such as powders, pills, extracts, tonics, teas, and confectionery.  Click here for permit information on ginseng. Check with APHIS and the State to meet their requirements.

Guitars

Do I need a permit to import or export my guitar?  Some guitars contain wildife, such as mother-of-pearl. If you are importing your personal guitar that contains wildlife as accompanying baggage, you must declare the item on the Customs declaration form. Click here for information if you are commercially importing or exporting guitars that contain wildlife or if you are separately shipping your personal guitar that contains wildlife.

Some guitars also contain Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra).  This species is listed in CITES Appendix I, and may not be traded for commercial purposes.  However, exceptions can be made for guitars that qualify as pre-Convention, i.e., contain rosewood that was obtained prior to June 11, 1992.  Click here for an application form to export or re-export pre-Convention guitars.  The guitar must enter or exit the United States through a plant designated port.  Check with APHIS, the State, and foreign country to meet their requirements.

Habitat Conservation plan (HCP)

HCP’s and Incidental Take Permits

Hippopotamus tusks

Do I need a permit to import hippopotamus ivory?  The hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibious) is listed in CITES Appendix II.  Click here for a CITES fact sheet

  • The United States recognizes the CITES personal effects exemption.  You do not need a CITES permit to import hippopotamus ivory when the item is part of accompanying baggage, is for your personal use, and the exporting country does not require you to have a permit. You must declare the tusk on the Customs form at the time of import.
  • Not all CITES countries recognize the personal effects exemption, and may require a CITES permit. Contact the foreign country to meets its requirements.
  • If the ivory item is being mailed or shipped separately, it must be accompanied by a CITES permit.
  • Click here for information if you are commercially importing or exporting hippopotamus tusks or if you are separately shipping personal items through the mail or as cargo.
  • A person engaged in business as an importer or exporter of wildlife must obtain an import/export license, and shipments of hippopotamus items must be accompanied by CITES permits.

Hylocereus

See Cactus, Supermarket Plants

Hunting and Fishing

Import of African Elephant

Import of Argali

Import of Bontebok

Import of Leopard

Import of Polar Bear

Import, Export, or Re-export of Sport-hunted Trophies

CITES:   Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
BGEPA: Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act
ESA:      Endangered Species Act
MBTA:   Migratory Bird Treaty Act
MMPA:  Marine Mammal Protection Act
WBCA:  Wild Bird Conservation Act

For additional information, visit the Fish and Wildlife Service's Frequently Asked Questions web site.