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Conserving the Nature of America
During a field visit at Fort McCoy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith is shown a Blanding's turtle, a Species of Special Concern in Wisconsin.
During a field visit at Fort McCoy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith is shown a Blanding's turtle, a Species of Special Concern in Wisconsin. Credit: Larry Dean/USFWS

Wisconsin’s Fort McCoy Honored with Military Conservation Partner Award

July 16, 2019

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service values its many partnerships with the military services and appreciates the role of military lands in conserving the nature of America. Last week, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith presented the Military Conservation Partnership Award to Fort McCoy for excellence in habitat restoration and wildlife management. Fort McCoy recently completed 107 high priority conservation projects, exceeding a 98 percent completion rate.
Fort McCoy Home to Rare Butterflies »


A sea of sandhill cranes, snow geese and Ross’s geese covering a landscape at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico.
During the winter months, sandhill cranes, snow geese and Ross’s geese often cover the landscape at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Credit: Celestyn Brozek

How to Get the Most out of a Visit to a National Wildlife Refuge

July 02, 2019
Timing is everything. “If you go to Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico in the summer, you’re not going to see much,” says National Wildlife Refuge System Chief Cynthia Martinez. “If you go in November, you will see a spectacle of wildlife and birds covering every part of that place. There’s a real seasonality to our refuges.”
More Visiting Tips »
Service staff and partners standing in woods area and wearing firer protection gear as they use fire controlling equipement to control fire a-blazed in front of them.
Service staff and partners work together to stay ahead of the potential for difficult wildfires in the Pacific Region. Credit: Brent Lawrence/USFWS

Managing with Prescribed Fire

July 02, 2019
Prescribed fires are never as simple as lighting a match and letting it burn. They’re scientific undertakings planned by the burn boss, who carefully considers safety, weather and more to achieve the fire’s objectives. Improved public safety and habitat management are two priorities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Fire Management Program.
Prescribed Burns in the Pacific Region »