Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

What's going on at FWS

With more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges, 70 national fish hatcheries, numerous regional and field offices across the country and thousands of active conservation projects, our 8,400+ employees of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have a lot going on. Here are a few of the latest news stories from across the Service...

A black-necked stilt benefits from the habitat at Huron Wetland Management District in South Dakota.
Migratory Species
Migratory Birds to Benefit from More Than $21 Million in Funding Throughout the Americas
More than two decades after the first Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act grants were awarded, birds and people throughout the Americas will benefit from a new round of projects, totaling more than $21 million in federal grants and matching funds.
A graphic of light blue waves on a blue background
Habitat Restoration
Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funds $13M in Orphaned Well Cleanup
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will put more than $13 million in Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) funding to work to plug 175 orphaned oil and gas wells on six national wildlife refuges in Louisiana and Oklahoma, helping communities eliminate environmental and public safety hazards caused by...
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Endangered Species Act
Service Proposes to List Four Species of Sturgeon in Eurasia as Endangered Under the ESA
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list four species of sturgeon in Eurasia - the Russian, Persian, ship and stellate sturgeon - as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The ancient freshwater fish are native to the Black, Azov, Caspian, Aegean and Aral sea basins of...
Pink flowers of Nelson's checkermallow
Endangered Species Act
Celebration and Reflection on Endangered Species Day
We take pride that more than 99% of all species protected under the Endangered Species Act in its nearly 50 years are still with us. But the world faces a crisis of extinction. Climate change has added threats like sea level rise and exacerbated existing ones such as habitat loss.
Close up of a California condor. Its pink featherless head contrasts with its black feathers.
Wildlife Management
California condor chick hatches on ‘Condor Cam’
The Condor Cam returned for the seventh year with a live streaming video, and on May 14 at 05:42 am, viewers around the world got a real-time look at a hard-won conservation success story with a first sighting of a freshly hatched condor chick.
a close up photo of a fisher
Wildlife Management
5 Species Supported By The State Wildlife Grant Program
Since 2001, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program has distributed over $1 billion to states, territories, and D.C. through the State Wildlife Grant Program (SWG). These funds are used by state and U.S. territory fish and wildlife agencies to develop and...

Our Focus

The history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can be traced back to 1871. We are the only federal government agency whose primary responsibility is to manage fish and wildlife resources in the public trust for people today and future generations. Here are just a few of our focus areas...

What We Do For You

If you’re looking for places to experience nature; interested in partnering with us; seeking technical advice, permits, grants, data or scientific research; want to know more about today’s conservation challenges; looking for ways on how you can get involved and make a difference -- the Service has a lot to offer and more…

Visit Us - Our Locations

With more than 560 national wildlife refuges, dozens of national fish hatcheries and more than 100 field offices, there are numerous great U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service locations to visit.