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Conserving the Nature of America
The 2017-2018 National Junior Duck Stamp art by Isaac Schreiber, 12, from Duffield, Va., with trumpeter swans on acrylic. Credit: USFWS
The 2017-2018 National Junior Duck Stamp art by Isaac Schreiber, 12, from Duffield, Va., with trumpeter swans on acrylic. Credit: USFWS

Secretary Zinke and USFWS Announce Winner of National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest

April 21, 2017
Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a talented young artist from Duffield, Va., took top honors at the National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest. A pair of trumpeter swans painted by 12-year-old Isaac Schreiber will grace the 2017-2018 Junior Duck Stamp, which raises funds to educate and engage our nation's youth in wildlife and wetlands conservation, and outdoor recreation.
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Through activities ranging from family workshops to summer explorations for kids,Tamarac Discovery Center – built with the fundraising acumen of the Friends of Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge – connects a Minnesota community with natural resources and Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Denise Warweg
Through activities ranging from family workshops to summer explorations for kids,Tamarac Discovery Center – built with the fundraising acumen of the Friends of Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge – connects a Minnesota community with natural resources and Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Denise Warweg

Friends Better Their Communities

April 19, 2017
Nonprofit Friends organizations are the helping hands of national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries. Some 200 Friends organizations work on behalf of national wildlife refuges. Thirty-three other groups work hand-in-hand with national fish hatcheries. As they work on behalf of conservation, they are improving your community, one project at a time.
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Samples from a tricolored bat, like the one pictured, tested positive for white-nose syndrome. Credit: Jena Donnell/ODWC
Samples from a tricolored bat, like the one pictured, tested positive for white-nose syndrome. Credit: Jena Donnell/ODWC

Eastern Oklahoma Bat Tests Positive for White-nose Syndrome

April 18, 2017
White-nose syndrome has been confirmed for the first time in Oklahoma, making it the 31st state with the deadly disease that affects hibernating bats. The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome was first detected in the state in 2015, but at that time bats did not appear to be sick. The disease has killed millions of bats since first being found in New York in the winter of 2006-2007. Bats play important ecological roles – including pest removal.
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